Archive for the ‘Arguments’ Category

Starting Today- The Voting Age Every Day

September 14, 2013

It’s time for people everywhere, whatever your age or political party, to start working to lower the voting age, to empower young people to get involved in their communities! Starting now, I will be posting daily videos and provide regular updates on developments in this critical issue. Here is the first, from a youth stage production in the UK called Political Will-

Here is Votes at 16!

Election 2012: The “I Want My Vote!” Campaign Begins!

March 10, 2012

All over the world, the movement to lower the voting age is growing: from Scotland, to Canada to Estonia people are waking up to the need for youth to have their voice heard in electing the leaders who will so greatly impact their future. Now it’s America’s turn!

In 2012, during this critical election year, young people of all ages are demanding more than mere promises or platitudes from politicians. They are raising their voices as one, to declare- “I Want My Vote!”

The “I Want My Vote” campaign is about young people, of all ages, of all politics and points of view, working together to bring about change.

Look for protests across America, in big cities and timely towns.
Young people will be speaking out, demanding the rights so many adults take for granted!
Check back here regularly for updates on key developments! Or better yet, Subscribe to this Blog!

And if you want to learn more about WHY the voting age must be lowered, check out the National Youth Rights Association’s excellent Top 10 Reasons to Lower the Voting Age and Voting Age Talking Points.

Huffington Post Columnist: Lower the Voting Age

June 10, 2009

The Huffington Post’s Nancy Lublin founder of sets forth yet another strong argument to lower the voting age to 17. Please check out the full article, but here are a few key points:

  • 17 year olds work (and pay taxes)
  • 17 year olds drive and operate heavy machinery
  • 17 year olds can be tried as adults in 36 states
  • 17 year olds can enlist in the miltary

As Ms. Lublin points out:

If we are comfortable entrusting these young individuals with defending our country and our honor, then they should be given the right to vote for their boss, the Commander in Chief. If we are comfortable arming them with a lethal weapon as they patrol in the name of freedom, then perhaps they’re responsible enough to be armed with the right to vote.

As the chorus grows for a lower voting age, I will try to increase my posts (hopefully daily).  There is a lot going on with this issue!  Let’s all get involved and play a part in history!

Another Voice for a Lower Voting Age

April 28, 2009

While you’ll hear a lot about big names supporting a lower voting age, from Michael Moore

to Nelson Mandela.  But the most important supporters of a lower voting age are ordinary people, and especially young people themselves!

Here is a brand new youtube video from Tracy Chacon, a youth intern with Albuquerque’s Southwest Organizing Project
Her arguments are based on fairness: teens work and pay taxes; they should have the right to vote for their own interests!
I will post more videos from young people themselves in support of a lower voting age! And I encourage everyone to record a youtube video argument your point of view!

So Why Lower the voting Age?

March 26, 2009

Your first question may be Why lower the voting age at all? Isn’t eighteen perfectly appropriate.
Here are my thoughts. Please add your own in the comments section.  There are really two central lines of argument.

  • Youth need the right to vote

On issue after issue, youth are most deeply and long-lastingly affected by the major problems that affect our society.  Whether it’s  climate change (which will affect them long after we are gone), the budget debt (which is on their backs) or social security (which they may never receive).  Additionally, most sixteen and seventeen year-olds work, and all youth under 18 pay over $9.7 billion taxes alone.

  • Lowering the Voting Age Would Encourage the Life Long Voting Habit

Allowing teens to vote at a younger age (say 16) would set youth on the path to lifelong voting.  Why?  Teens who are 16 or 17 usually live at home, most in communities they have resided for many years. They are often closely tied to those communities, and keenly feel local political developments (whether changes in education quality or city curfew laws). On the other hand, many 18 year olds are in a new community (often away at school). But even if still at home they are usually occupied by full-time work or college. Thus, high school students are more likely to exercise their right to vote than their college siblings would be.